Anna Ushenina,
14th World Women Champion 2012
Olympic Champ. 2006




International
Chess Match among ICC Students




Internet Chess Club

Did you know
that Chess makes
man happy?



I am convinced that examination of your games
is the key to improvement of chess skills.

This is the method I use in teaching my students:
1. I look for weak points in strategy by deeply analyzing games
2. I prepare exercises and assign homework targeted to improve these weak points.
3. The approach is iterative. As students progress, I reassess their play, looking for areas which require continued effort, and homework assignments are adjusted accordingly.

Here is a more detailed description of the approach I bring to instruction:
- Learning or improving any Opening line by demonstrating tactical and thematic motifs. Providing illustrative games.
- Having examined hundreds of games played by my students I have come to the conclusion that their mistakes lie not only in the sphere of strategy and tactics, but also in their psychology. Therefore, in addition to basic courses I have developed a range of complimentary courses, such as "Winning a Won Game" and "Skills of Exchange." The aim of these courses is to help the student discover internal processes of struggle and to realize his full potential.
- I strongly recommend that students not use a chess engine for doing their homework. It kills independent thinking! If you really want to progress in chess, you need to learn to think independently at the board.
- No pain, no gain. You can't become a strong chess player after a couple of chess lessons, and you can't progress if you do not work on your own. A coach can give a student a general direction for work, but it is for the student to do that work and learn.
- Training games with chat. We may not only play chess but also chat while playing! This way you can find out what a chess master's thinking during the game is like. To compare it with your own approach might be quite instructive.
- Try to make chess a form of self-expression and fun at the same time. That's a great feeling. Always have a joy :).
- Nobody can observe our private chess lessons

I look forward to having you as my student!

Rubinstein - Duras
Karlsbad, 1911
"Skills of Exchange"



Can White win a pawn on a6
instead of exchanging it for
a pawn on b3?
Karpov - Kasparov
Moscow (m41), 1984
"Winning a won game"



How could Karpov win this game and the match against Kasparov in 1984 with a score 6:1 and to save his WCC title?



Does this Test look
a bit hard? click here





Site Map:  Красивое облако тегов
Для корректного отображения этого элемента вам необходимо установить FlashPlayer и включить в браузере Java Script.


Copyright © 2008-2016 ChessStudy.com, Inc. - All Rights Reserved